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  • ​KAUST Conference on Sustainable Urban-Environmental Future

    April 1 - 3, 2019

    Conference Center Building 19, Level 3 - Hall 1

  • ​KAUST Inn Location

  • ​KAUST December 2018 Commencement

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​About

The conference is inspired by the surging interest in smart cities and smart environmental systems worldwide. The ever-increasing capabilities of sensing, communications, and computation will be key enablers of future destinations that are designed for livability, efficiency, and affordability, all the while ensuring sustainability and environmental stewardship.  The conference will feature research presentations on smart solutions for energy, transportation, urban planning, and monitoring, as well as the supporting foundational areas of networks and communications; signal processing and big data; high performance computing; and cyberphysical systems.



Agenda
  • MondayApril 1
  • TuesdayApril 2
  • WednesdayApril 3
8:00 AM

Breakfast

9:00 AM

Welcome & Opening Remarks

Welcome & Opening Remarks

 gaTony Chan
KAUST University President
9:15 AM

Opportunities and Challenges in Smart Buildings and Smart Cities including Data Science, Connected Energy Technologies and Predictive Control

Buildings are one of the most important sectors in both developed and emerging economies. As urbanization continues, over half the world’s population live in cities, with the role of cities continuing to grow. There is an urgent need to evaluate and implement strategies and technologies to minimize energy use and address environmental issues in cities. This presentation will provide an overview of key research in the building energy sector and urban science with an emphasis on energy benchmarking, big data, predictive modeling, connected energy technologies, and energy simulation and control. The presentation will cover both practical activities underway in city energy analysis, such as building energy benchmarking and disclosure laws, as well as the use of city scale data standards, exascale computational research, and urban energy models.

 2Mary Ann Piette
Scientific Division Director, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA
10:15 AM

Coffee Break

10:30 AM

Smart Cities Planning: Egypt Case Study

The whole world is experiencing a new wave of what is called smart cities and societies. This wave is interdisciplinary by nature and is a new frontier where real estate developers collaborate very closely with information and communication technologists. The notion of smartness does not only imply improved living style, but more importantly efficiency and cost reduction. Cities around the globe compete to achieve higher scores under different definitions of smartness indices. This talk composes of two parts. The first one introduces the main aspects of defining a smart city. Some highlights will be shed on the international activities in relation to the planning and development of smart cities and sustainable communities. The second and the main part of this talk addresses the Egypt case study wherein the institutional and architectural model will be presented in more details. The design concept will be explained with more focus on the enabling infrastructure upon which all smart services can be offered. Common success factors for smart cities will be presented and analyzed.

 hFadel Digham
Executive Director, National Telecom Regulator Authority of Egypt
11:00 AM

Event-Based Reinforcement Learning for Cyber-Physical Energy Systems – Smart Buildings, Smart Grid, and Smart Cities

Cyber physical energy system (CPES) is where information and energy merges together to improve the overall system performance including economic, comfort, and safety aspects. Artificial intelligence which are enabled by internet of things, big data, and cloud computing, has a big role in the optimization of CPES. In this talk, we focus on event-based reinforcement learning (eRL) which makes decisions according to events instead of states. This method provides a scalable solution for large-scale multi-stage decision making problem in which an accurate model may not be available. The performance of this method will be demonstrated by examples in smart buildings, smart micro-grid of buildings, and smart cities, and in particular on the problem of stochastic matching between the renewable power generation and the uncertain charging demand from the plug-in electric vehicles (PHEVs) in a city. We will also discuss extensions of this method to distributed optimization. We hope this work sheds light to the optimization of CPES.

 pQing-Shan Jia
Associate Professor, Center for Intelligent and Networked Systems, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China
11:30 AM

IoT and Big Data for Energy Management in Buildings

Driven by rapid urban development, rising incomes and population, energy consumption in buildings in Saudi Arabia has been rising by around 6 per cent per annum on average since 2010. Responsible for around 65 per cent of residential electricity consumption, where cooling has been the main driver of this trend. Also, oil still accounting for around 40% of fuel inputs in the electricity generation fuel mix. There are a number of factors driving concerns about the energy usage within buildings. These range from system wide issues, such as greenhouse gas reduction and reducing peak load (to control distribution network capital investment), through to individual consumer issues, such as reducing overall power consumption. In KAPSARC, we explore the feasibility and impact of IoT and Big Data technologies on buildings overall energy consumption and thermal comfort. Extracting distinctive knowledge on usage, behaviour and performance patterns to empower policy-makers to design better building codes, market regulations and services.

 cbThamir Al Shehri
Senior Research Associate, Energy Transitions & Electric Power, King Abdullah Petroleum Studies and Research Center (KAPSARC), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
12:00 PM

Lunch

1:30 PM

Sustainable Public Realm & the Existing Opportunities

Recently, sustainability has become a common consideration for urban development. In urban development, especially in public urban realm, the issue of sustainability is significant because it deals with many dimensions such as environmental, social, economic, transportation …. Etc. Various elements of public Realm, including streets, are places where people meet interact and go about their life. The focus of this presentation is determining the influence of considering sustainability in planning and managing public realm. From the complex spectrum of features of sustainability, only those that are directly related to the physical features of streets and other public realm elements are analyzed. The presentation is dealing with the urban environmental setting in Saudi Arabia and will pick examples as well as offers suggestions and recommendations to the local issues. The goal of this presentation is highlighting the importance of considering the issue of sustainability in planning and managing every day public realm.

 eOmar Bahammam
Professor, Architecture and Planning, King Saud University, KSA
2:00 PM

Intelligent Transportation Systems for Smart Cities

The use of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) is an essential component of Smart Cities. The use of ITS has been a major focus of research for several years. Some cities in the Gulf region started using some ITS technologies (such as; variable message signs (VMS), automatic toll collection, and actuated signal control). This presentation focuses on the major components of ITS and their applications. An overview of the Dynamic Traffic Assignment (DTA) concept is illustrated with some sample formulations and solution procedures. In addition, it provides some present and future applications that may utilize DTA. Finally, some numerical results are presented to highlight the positive impacts of ITS on the transportation network’s performance.

 aAkmal Abdelfatah
Professor, Civil Engineering; American University of Sharjah, UAE
2:30 PM

Formal Control of Traffic Systems

Smart city applications have become increasingly widespread with the advancements in the in the IoT and CPS fields. A pioneering area among these is the smart traffic systems as inefficient traffic management has adverse effects on both economy and environment. Traffic systems are naturally complex due to the different transport infrastructures (signalized intersections, metered ramps, crossings) and their diverse range of stakeholders, e.g. vehicles, pedestrians, bicyclists. Moreover, the traffic management system needs to consider a set of control objectives involving congestion avoidance, fair share of signal turns, prioritization for pedestrian crossings. In recent years, efficient formal approaches are developed for control of complex systems from rich specifications expressed in temporal logics. In this talk, I will give a short introduction to formal control of traffic systems from such rich control objectives. I will, first, describe an efficient model construction method for traffic systems based on their structural properties, and then briefly explain the synthesis of control strategies for such models. Then, I will show that the formal control approach can be applied to large traffic systems via network decomposition. Finally, I will briefly talk about an alternative approach: identification of controllable causes of undesired events and avoidance via controller synthesis.

 kEbru Aydin Gol
Assistant Professor, Computer Engineering, Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey
3:00 PM

Coffee Break

3:30 PM

Detailed Urban Air Flow Modelling for the Design and Management of Buildings and Cities and Green and Blue Infrastructure

Our aim here is to further develop validated modelling methods (within the MAGIC modelling framework) that can help design and manage our cities, buildings and traffic systems to produce sustainable, safer, healthier, and more comfortable urban environments. The resulting virtual city framework will also assimilate pollution, wind, and thermal city sensor data, providing a tool to enable the rational management of a city and its infrastructure in response to changing pollution and weather conditions, or for emergency response. We present our ideas towards this vision of achieving a sustainable living environment through innovative techniques. We have already developed insight and tools that have helped to understand human impact in the local environment (e.g. MAGIC, DAPPLE).

 uChristopher Pain
Professor, Department of Earth Science & Engineering, Imperial College, London, UK
4:00 PM

Forecasting the Urban Environment: A Multiscale Modeling and Sensing Problem

Building an environmentally sustainable, smart city requires developing a managing environment to intelligently, sustainably and adaptively operate the city within the local environment. This could be forged through the development and combination of innovative modeling and sensing techniques capable of resolving the environmental processes and predicting their short- and long-term behaviors at the urban scales. This talk will discuss the required multi-approaches to build such a managing system that is dynamically capable of (i) seamlessly representing the local environment at the city scales, and (ii) efficiently exploiting in real-time multi-data from large urban sensors networks

 mIbrahim Hoteit
Associate Professor, Earth Science and Engineering, Physical Science and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal, Saudi Arabia
4:30 PM

Energy Consumption and QoS in Networks and the Cloud

The consumption of electrical energy by ICT systems seems to be increasing at a steady annual rate, despite significant efforts to build more energy efficient ICT devices. For comparison, one can estimate that the total electricity consumption by ICT systems is similar to the total electricity consumption of Germany plus Japan. Thus various means to reduce or limit this growth have been introduced, both at the device level, and for systems as a whole, but further research and practical efforts are required. In this presentation we will focus on how trade-offs can be achieved between the quality of service experienced by users and the energy consumption by the systems, based on mathematical models and experimental results. Depending on time availability, dynamic energy and workload management models based with the Energy Packet Network paradigm and futuristic particle based communication schemes will also be considered.

 1Erol Gelenbe
Professor, Institute of Theoretical and Applied Informatics (IITIS-PAN), Polish Academy of Sciences & Imperial College London; French National Academy of Technologies
6:00 PM

Dinner

Gala Dinner at Yacht Club Restaurant. Bus will depart from KAUST Inn at 6:00 & 6:15 PM. By Invitation.

8:00 AM

Breakfast

9:00 AM

Welcome & Opening Remarks

Welcome & Opening Remarks

 gbKevin Cullen
Vice President of Innovation and Economic Development, KAUST
9:15 AM

Community Internet of Things Testbeds

Nanotechnology and advances in electronic and optoelectronic devices have revolutionized computing and communication. The next wave, internet of things (IoT) and data analytics, can have broader impact in solving societal grand challenges at the nexus of energy, water, and food. A key challenge for many small cities and rural communities is the access to expensive state-of-the-art facilities as well as high tech ecosystem to be effective in a knowledge economy. Developments in software, modeling tools, and apps provide an opportunity to contribute but at the same time, their impact to solve societal grand challenges may be limited. Some of the opportunities and challenges related to IoT, data analytics, and distributed manufacturing will be described. Examples will be given from a $40M regional initiative between Purdue and the ten surrounding counties in north central Indiana through Wabash Heartland Innovation Network (WHIN). WHIN’s goal is develop a high tech ecosystem in digital agriculture and in next generation manufacturing empowered by IoT.

 3Ali Shakouri
Professor, Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University
10:15 AM

Coffee Break

10:30 AM

Session 4: Energy Systems

Chaired by Nazek El-Atab, Post-Doctoral Research Fellow, KAUST Bio Dr. Nazek El-Atab is currently a Post-Doctoral research fellow with Professor Muhammad Mustafa Hussain at the MMH labs at KAUST. Her current research focuses on the design and fabrication of futuristic electronics. She received her B.Sc. degree in Computer and Communications Engineering from the Rafik Hariri University, Lebanon, in 2012, her M.Sc. degree in Microsystems Engineering from the Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, Abu Dhabi, UAE, in 2014, and her Ph.D. degree in Interdisciplinary Engineering from the Masdar Institute in 2017. She has received several awards for her research, including the 2015 For Women in Science Middle East Fellowship by L’Oreal-UNESCO, Best Paper Award in the Micro/Nano-systems section at the UAEGSRC 2016 conference, the 2016 IEEE Nanotechnology Student Travel Award in Japan, the 2017 International Rising Talents Award by L’Oreal-UNESCO, the 2018 “Rafik Hariri University” Alumni Award, and was portrayed in the 2019 “Remarkable Women in Technology” by UNESCO. She has published over 30 papers in international peer-reviewed scientific journals and conference proceedings and 2 book chapters, and has 2 U.S. filed patents. She has served as a Jury member for the 2017 For Women in Science Middle East Fellowship by L’Oreal-UNESCO and a member of the Panel of Experts for the 2019 For Women in Science Awards by L’Oreal-UNESCO. She is also a reviewer for several scientific journals including IEEE Transactions on Electron Devices, IEEE Electron Device Letters, Applied Physics Letters, ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ACS Applied Electronic Materials, and the Institute of Physics Nanotechnology.

10:35 AM

Controlling Wind Farm Arrays for Improved Power Performance

Wind farms can be viewed as large networks of dynamical systems, to which the application of traditional optimization techniques is impractical. In this talk, we discuss tractable approaches to maximize power extraction from wind turbine arrays under variable wind conditions. These approaches include extensions to dynamic programming and model predictive control methods, as well as the application of distributed control methods, where we explicitly account for changing wind conditions. We will provide a high-level overview of these methods and their application to wind farm arrays, and present simulation results demonstrating expected performance outcomes.

 fCarolyn Beck
Associate Professor , University of Illinois, Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering
11:00 AM

Building Efficient, Sustainable & Resilient Grid by Controlling the Edge

The evolution of the electricity grid faces significant challenges if it is to integrate and accept more energy from renewable generation and other Distributed Energy Resources (DERs). To maintain grid's reliability and turn intermittent power sources into major contributors to the energy mix, we have to think about the grid differently and design it to be smarter and more flexible. This talk will identify opportunities in developing next generation control technologies and grid operation paradigms that address these challenges and enable efficient, sustainable and reliable transmission and distribution of electrical power. Disruptive technologies that enable increased integration of DERs by real-time adaptation while maintaining grid reliability and reducing cost for customers with smart technologies will be presented. Innovative approaches to coordinated management of bulk generation, DERs, flexible loads, and storage assets with multiple roles, and revenue streams will be discussed.

 jSonja Glavaski
Executive Vice President of Innovation, The Faraday Grid, USA
11:30 AM

Energy Security in Saudi Arabia: Challenges, Threats and Solutions

Energy security is a major concern for many countries, given worries over peak oil and recent spikes in oil and gas prices. This has been made worse by growing concerns over the environmental implications associated with the extensive use and reliance on hydrocarbons. These concerns have become manifest in a range of governmental policy issues and responses. Oil importers are seeking to diversify their energy sources, not only to reduce dependence on a finite energy resource, but also to move to less environmentally-damaging energy resources and to diversify the countries from whom energy can be imported. These factors have combined to raise interest in the potential of renewable energy to unprecedented levels. Furthermore, improving energy efficiency can help to reduce the demand for oil imports, as well as help to tackle damaging emissions. The particular focus of this study is Saudi Arabia. It may at first sight seem improbable that the largest oil producer in the world faces energy security concerns. Paradoxically, however, it is precisely this position that has helped to create the conditions for such concerns within the country. Saudi Arabia is hugely dependent on the revenues from oil exports for its economic security. More immediately, Saudi Arabia is facing a rapid growth in domestic energy demand. If left unchecked, this could undermine Saudi Arabia’s ability to maintain oil exports at prevailing levels. As a result, there is an urgent need to investigate the issue of energy security in Saudi Arabia; an area which has been largely neglected by previous research. Findings of this study suggests that Saudi Arabia experiences distinct aspects of the energy security problem. The country could be at extremely high risk in the future, because oil seems to be the valve for the country’s energy and economic security. Saudi Arabia considers that renewable energy and energy efficiency could be the best solutions for energy security concerns. This study argues that there are important overlaps with these two areas. Moreover, the renewable energy sector in the country is in the early stages of development; and is lagging behind even other neighboring Middle Eastern oil exporting-countries. This study, therefore, seeks to expand the available knowledge related to renewable energy barriers in an oil-dependent economy. It is apparent that in order to allow Saudi Arabia to maintain its position in the future as the largest oil exporter in the world, whilst improving its energy and economic security, the country requires major changes in its existing energy structure. Therefore, this research seeks to provide a clear understanding of the impact of, and role played by, government policy in the energy sector, cultural awareness about energy efficiency and renewable energy, and effective administration in the energy organizations in helping to ease energy security concerns in the Kingdom via a significant expansion in the capacity for renewable energy generation.

 qSamar Saber Khan
Assistant Professor and Dean of College of Business, Effat University, KSA
12:00 PM

Lunch & Poster Session

The Digital displays will be at the library. Also, the Eposters maybe accessed online at: https://epostersonline.com/suef2019/

2:30 PM

Session 5: Electronics & Sensors

Chaired by Nadeem Qaiser, Post-Doctoral Research Fellow, KAUST Bio Dr. Nadeem Qaiser has received his B.Sc. in Mechanical Engineering (with Honors) from University of Engineering and Technology (UET), Taxila, Pakistan, in 2007. He started as a Production engineer at ECOPACK PVT. LTD, Pakistan. Later, he did his MSc. and Ph.D. studies, in 2010 and 2016, respectively, in Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon, South Korea, which is highly ranked the university as top 50 engineering universities of the world by “QS ranking”. He has served in COMSATS of Institute of Science and Technology for 3 years and one year at Korean MEMS sensors manufacturing company. Currently, he is working as a Postdoctoral researcher with Prof. Muhammad Mustafa Hussain, at KAUST since 2017. During his career, he has won various merit-based fellowships. He won the MS studies fellowship from Govt. of Pakistan under Higher Education Commission Scheme. He also won the Ph.D. fellowship at KAIST, Korea. He has published over 20 international journal and conference papers. He is a reviewer of various journals including the Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Optics & Laser Technology, and others.

2:35 PM

Internet-of-Drones for Smart Cities

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) - also known as Drones, are becoming increasingly popular. Although these have been around for already a few years, applications’ developers and researchers are realizing more recently the potential of these flying robots in civil applications such as remote sensing, smart cities, surveillance, disaster management and recovery, patrolling, aerial survey, border security etc. to name a few. Although these low-cost UAVs can be utilized in many beneficial ways, the strictly limited processing capabilities, as well as their low on-board storage, raise several challenges. In fact, low-cost and battery-powered UAVs are unable to cope efficiently with the requirements of computation-demanding applications (e.g., onboard image processing) encompassing real-time data and reliability constraints. Furthermore, with the limitation of the communication range of wireless-based drones, even when using telemetry systems (with range up to 5 Km), it is not possible to manage drones’ mission in large environments such as at the scale of a city, or a country. As part of cloud robotics initiatives, there is an increasing trend of integrating drones to leverage the use of cloud computing and the Internet of Things (IoT). In this presentation, I will provide an overview of the concept and the Internet-of-Drones and its applications in the context of smart cities. I will present, Dronemap Planner, which is a cloud-based management system that allows the control and monitoring of drones through the Internet. I will also present the different applications developed based on this system and discuss their performance issues. In addition, we will focus on how the Internet-of-Drones along with Artificial Intelligence can promote a new bunch of applications for smart cities, including surveillance, traffic monitoring, multi-drone collaboration, law enforcement, etc.

 sAnis Koubaa
Professor, Computer Science, Prince Sultan University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
3:00 PM

V2V-based Technology for Real-Time Applications of Autonomous Vehicles

This presentation discusses a new technology that uses inter-vehicular communication (IVC)-based smart algorithm for real-time route guidance in urban traffic networks. The new technology can be used for several applications such as autonomous vehicles communication, incident alerts, and route diversions among many. The algorithm enables communication between any two vehicular entities. The data entities of knowledge sharing among the vehicles and the algorithmic procedure as well as the conditions for information sharing are presented in detail. A microscopic simulation model is utilized to assess the effectiveness of the algorithm Detailed system’s functional analysis was performed, and subsequently, the technical requirements were identified. Based on these requirements, some On-Board Units (OBU’s) were designed, and the functionality validated with different test cases.

 lYaser Hawas
Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering at the UAE University, UAE
3:30 PM

Smart Village: Empowering Humanity with Accessible and Sustainable Electronic Technology

We always hear about smart cities, but rarely, we hear about smart villages although nearly half of the world’s population live in rural areas. While today’s most advanced technologies are geared toward a more digital future, precision healthcare, enhanced convenience and safety – but they are mostly for those who can afford them easily and most probably they already live a more comfortable life. It might alarming that in addition to gross income inequality, there is increasingly rise of gross technological inequality. Therefore, by developing accessible (affordable and simple) electronic technologies with sustainable materials and processes and for sustainable applications, we can assist those billions to augment the quality of their life. Therefore, we are singularly focused on developing and deploying democratized electronics. Electronics which are carefully designed and optimally crafted using non-functionalized sustainable household materials, environmentally benign processes and assembled through Do-It-Yourself (DIY) integration strategies. Our objective is to develop electronics which are simple to learn and easy to use. Therefore, we are making them interactive thus anyone can use them – anyone from any age group without any language or financial barrier. Additionally, we are testing an ad-hoc manufacturing ecosystem to use local sustainable materials and skills to provide local solutions with global impact. We use minimalist approach in context of using CMOS electronics for data and cost management. A few applications will be shown focusing on paper skin, paper watch, wearable stethoscope, and oddly enough how such low-cost technology can be used to fight against medication related overdose or addiction.

 oMuhammad Hussain
Professor, Computer, Electrical, and Mathematical Science and Engineering (CEMSE) Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal, Saudi Arabia
4:00 PM

Broad-Spectrum Electronic Biomolecular Sensing for Food Safety

Conventional electronic biomolecular sensors use charge transfer across an electrically biased electrode-electrolyte interface as the detection mechanism. Specificity to a single analyte molecule is possible by functionalizing the electrode with an engineered protein. Recent research at Stanford [1,2] has introduced a new class of electronic biomolecular sensor, in which the interface is designed to transduce information about intra-molecular bond vibrational frequencies of non-redox active molecular species. This information can be observed in the tunneling current vs. voltage signature across a nanoscale electrochemical interface, for the case where (i) the nanoscale interface is designed to operate between the adiabatic and non-adiabatic charge-transfer regimes and (ii) the signature is measured using an ultralow noise potentiostat. In this talk, I will first discuss the design guidelines for the nanoscale electrochemical interface, which are derived from a circuit model based on a quantum mechanical analysis of the intermediate tunneling regime. For the initial demonstration of the nanoscale sensing interface, we used serial prototyping techniques (e.g., focused ion beam etching). Current vs. voltage scans demonstrate the operating regimes of the interface and its ability to detect subtle differences in analytes. The biomolecular sensor has recently been benchmarked for several assays relevant to food safety [3]. 1. C. Gupta, et al., “Active Control of Probability Amplitudes in a Mesoscale System via Feedback-Induced Suppression of Dissipation and Noise,” J. Appl. Phys., 120, 224902 (2016). 2. C. Gupta, et al., “Quantum Tunneling Currents in a Nanoengineered Electrochemical System,” J. Phys. Chem. C, 121, 15085–15105 (2017). 3. C. Gupta, “Novel Electronic Assay of Microbiological and other Contaminants in Diverse Food Matrices for Rapid Time-to-Answer Safety Testing, AOAC Int. Ann. Meeting, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, Aug. 26-29, 2018.

 nRoger Howe
Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University
6:00 PM

Dinner

Dinner at the Island Recreation Center Restaurant Pure. Bus will depart from KAUST Inn at 6:00 & 6:15 PM. By invitation.

8:00 AM

Breakfast

9:00 AM

Security Considerations for Cyberphysical Systems

Recent research has shown that cyber physical systems lag behind the general computer industry in cybersecurity. A recent paper has shown how easy it is to break into the electric power grid in the USA, and how the practices of cybersecurity are often ignored in these environments. Equally, software systems for cyber physical systems pay little attention to security, as demonstrated by the recent bugs discovered in a version of Linux that is designed for embedded systems. It is naive to believe that the problem can be automated or that solutions from the general practice can carry easily into cyber physical systems where constraints of power and size, and the large scale deployment pose challenges for system management unequalled in the history of the industry. We will touch on some design principles to mitigate these problems.

 haMootaz Elnozahy
Dean of Computer, Electrical and Mathematical Science and Engineering, KAUST
9:30 AM

The “Green Revolution” is a Transition to What?

Humanity faces existential threats: climate warming, overpopulation, rampant pollution and decline of all high-quality resources. However, almost all world governments are pushing continuation of business as usual, albeit by “greener” means. Commendable behavior of a few individuals has almost zero effect on the resource-wasting societies. The 11.1 terawatts of continuous power from oil and coal cannot be replaced with photovoltaics (PV) within a reasonable time; a transition to wind turbines is even less probable. Even if humanity devoted 35 million barrels of oil per day (Mbopd) to the solar PV transition, it still would take 51 years. Devoting 1 billion tons of coal per year would make this transition happen in 128 years. Currently we do not have 35 Mbopd and 1 billion tons of coal to spare for decades. In fact, without investing 14 trillion USD over the next 20 years, world oil production might drop to 20 Mbopd, less than I chose to devote each year for 51 years to the very large size (VLS) PV arrays. Since all other means have been exhausted, we must limit and reverse population growth and consume much less of everything. Otherwise, we will continue to commit suicide as a species, while denying the truth.

 ubTadeusz Patzek
Professor, Energy Resources and Petroleum Engineering and Director, Ali I. Al-Naimi Petroleum Engineering Research Center
10:15 AM

Coffee Break

10:30 AM

Session 6: Wireless Communication

Chaired by Ki-Hong Park, Research Scientist, KAUST Bio Ki-Hong Park received the B.Sc. degree in electrical, electronic, and radio engineering from Korea University, Seoul, Korea, in 2005 and the joint M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the School of Electrical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul, Korea, in 2011. He joined KAUST as a postdoctoral fellow in April, 2011. Since December 2014, he has been working as a Research Scientist of Electrical Engineering in the Division of Computer, Electrical, Mathematical Science and Engineering (CEMSE), King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal, Saudi Arabia. His research interests are in the broad field of communication theory and its application to the design and performance evaluation of wireless communication systems and networks. On-going research includes the application to underwater visible light communication, optical wireless communications, unmanned aerial vehicle communication and physical layer secrecy.

10:35 AM

Wireless Evolution Towards 5G and Beyond

The 5th generation (5G) mobile communication services are now about to start. An increasing popularity of broadband communication services and starting of new communication services, e.g. massive IoT and mission-critical communications services, demand a significant improvement in the spectrum efficiency and energy efficiency of 5G mobile communication networks. Promising approach is to enhance the radio access network (RAN) by using MIMO technology. After briefly overviewing the evolution of mobile communications network, we will overview the recent advances in distributed MIMO RAN. A number of distributed antennas are deployed over a traditional cell area covered by a base station (BS). They are connected to the BS by the optical mobile fronthaul. Distributed MIMO RAN exploits the spatial distribution of both antennas and users. Some of distributed antennas near a user equipment (UE) are selected to perform distributed MIMO cooperative transmission. A new frequency band, e.g. mm wave band, where abundant bandwidth remains unused, will be utilized. Therefore, the received signals experience high Doppler shift, which cases the channel estimation problem. Furthermore, adjacent BSs are loosely connected, and hence, the inter-cell interference (ICI) problem will be produced. In this talk, we will present adaptive channel estimation and adaptive ICI coordination (ICIC). Finally, we will discuss about RAN evolution into beyond 5G.

 bFumiyuki Adachi
Specially Appointed Professor for Research, Research Organization of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
11:00 AM

Machine-Type Communications (MTC) in Wireless Networks: Challenges, Algorithmic Design and Performance Analysis

Wireless communications are fast evolving in order to meet the emergence of new domains in the market of the wireless communications, such as smart cities, eHealth, automotive, etc. The future wireless networks are expected to support a high increase in traffic demand and to tackle the challenge of connecting billions of devices with heterogeneous service requirements. This necessitates drastic changes in the network paradigm in addition to a large array of disruptive innovations at both physical and networking layers. This talk will provide an overview of the recent advances in this area with a main focus on the technologies required to support the demands of a high number of connected MTC devices with low data capacity and/or latency-sensitivity requirements. Intuitive understanding of recent research results and identification of some open problems will also be presented.

 dMohamad Assaad
Professor, Telecommunications Department, CentraleSupélec, Paris, France
11:30 AM

Key Technologies for Behavior-Driven Intelligent Vehicular Networks

The vehicles are now powerful sensor platforms, have ability sensing and harvesting data from around and feeding back after analysis to drivers and infrastructures to assist navigation, traffic management, and resources allocation. Meanwhile, the vehicular networks are increasingly moving towards intelligence to support the diverse requirements of wireless users and the corresponding real-time data processing. In this talk, the overall background of intelligent vehicular networks will be briefly given, including the definition, standards and global trends. Then this talk will introduce the key research aspects of intelligent vehicular networks from the perspective of vehicular behaviors, including analysis/prediction of user and vehicle behaviors, smart network deployment, data-driven wireless resource management, and social-aware information security. Besides, this talks will give several concrete examples that we explored on the road to intelligent vehicular networks.

 wHaixia Zhang
Professor, School of Control Science and Engineering, Shandong University
12:00 PM

Lunch

1:30 PM

Session 7: Applications Networks

Chaired by Prof. Basem Shihada

 vBasem Shihada
Associate Professor, Computer, Electrical and Mathematical Science and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal, Saudi Arabia
1:35 PM

Large Intelligent Surfaces Assisted MIMO – A Vision for 6G Wireless Communication Systems

The explosive increase in the data rate requirements of beyond Fifth Generation (5G) wireless networks, which are expected to connect billions of wireless devices via dense deployments of multi-antenna base stations (BS)s, have raised critical concerns on the resulting network energy consumption. Large Intelligent Surface (LIS) is envisioned as a promising energy efficient technology for Sixth Generation (6G) networks that can offer unprecedented Massive Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) gains. The LIS comprises of a large number of low-cost passive reflecting elements that can smartly reconfigure the signal propagation for performance enhancement. The resulting LIS can be readily integrated into the facades of the buildings surrounding the BS. In this talk, we introduce this new technology with its important modeling features as well as challenges and open questions.

 caMohamed-Slim Alouini
Professor and Associate Dean, Computer, Electrical, and Mathematical Science and Engineering (CEMSE) Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal, Saudi Arabia
2:00 PM

Aerial Data Aggregation in IoT Networks: A Novel Paradigm with Application to Forest Fire Fighting

The next era of information revolution will rely on aggregating big data from massive numbers of devices that are widely scattered in our environment. This presentation proposes aerial data aggregation from a finite spatial field via an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). Instead of fusing, relaying, and routing the data across the wireless nodes to fixed locations access points, a UAV flies over the field and collects the required data. Particularly, the field is divided into several subregions where the UAV hovers over each subregion to collect samples from the underlying nodes. To this end, an optimization problem is formulated and solved to find the optimal number of subregions, the area of each subregion, the hovering locations, the hovering time at each location, and the trajectory between hovering locations so that a certain number of samples are collected from the field in minimal time. The results show that there exists an optimal number of subregions that balance the tradeoff between the hovering and traveling times. We apply our model to Forest Fire tracking which forms a major economic challenge for many countries worldwide. We consider a stochastic fire spread model to approximate the fire behavior. Then, we analyze and optimize system parameters to study the effectiveness of such UAV aided wireless sensor networks for early forest fire detection.

 cTareq Al-Naffouri
Associate Professor, Computer, Electrical and Mathematical Science and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal, Saudi Arabia
2:30 PM

Digital Twin for Citizens’ Wellbeing

A digital twin is a digital replication of a living or non-living physical entity. By bridging the physical and the virtual worlds, data is transmitted seamlessly allowing the virtual entity to exist simultaneously with the physical entity. A digital twin facilitates the means to monitor, understand, and optimize the functions of the physical entity and provides continuous feedback to improve quality of life and wellbeing of citizens in smart cities. In this talk, we will discuss the convergence of multimedia technologies (AR/VR, AI, IoT, Wearables, BigMM Data and 5G-Tactile Internet) towards the digital twin for health care. We will conclude by describing the challenges and the open research questions.

 iAbdulmotaleb El Saddik
Distinguished Professor and University Research Chair, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Ottawa, Canada
3:00 PM

Coffee Break

3:30 PM

Session 8: Internet of Things

Chaired by Prof. Tareq Al-Naffouri

 cTareq Al-Naffouri
Associate Professor, Computer, Electrical and Mathematical Science and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal, Saudi Arabia
3:35 PM

Internet of Things: Enabling Cross-Domain Convergence and Innovation

Internet of Things (IoT) is a facilitating technology that helps bridge legacy, present, and futuristic technologies towards achieving a universal, uniform, faster, and deeper technological penetration in the modern day society. Besides bridging technological divides, IoT has resulted in the development of innovative schemes, solutions, and even technologies, which fill-in the gaps arising as a result of the convergence of numerous technologies and devices into a unified platform. From a networking perspective, innovation and developments in hardware, and algorithmic schemes for addressing, device management, topology management, energy optimization, and forecasting in various cross-domain areas have resulted in the huge popularity of IoT-based systems. Domains such as healthcare, agriculture, home automation, transportation, logistics, surveillance, defence, traffic management, power distribution, and others are some of the biggest consumers of IoT and IoT-based services. As a result of the need for convergence of a wide variety of information towards a common goal, technologies such as Cloud Computing, Sensor Cloud, Big Data, Software Defined Radios and Networks, Machine Learning, Deep Learning, Social Sensing, and Smartphone Computing have witnessed major developments in the recent few years. This talk will have special focus on showcasing some of the research works done by the Speaker on IoT at the SWAN Lab (http://cse.iitkgp.ac.in/~smisra/swan/) of IIT Kharagpur.

 tSudip Misra
Professor, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, India
4:00 PM

SADIQ: a Context Aware IoT System

In this talk, I will identify the unique quality of service (QoS) needs of emerging IoT applications and propose SADIQ, which is a software-defined network (SDN) system that addresses these needs. SADIQ provides location-aware, context driven QoS for IoT applications by allowing applications to express their requirements using a location-based abstraction and a high-level SQL-like policy language, and the network to support these requirements through recent advances in SDNs. SADIQ is implemented using commodity OpenFlow-enabled switches and an open-source SDN controller and evaluate its effectiveness using traces from two real IoT applications. SADIQ system source code is made publicly available for the research community.

 vBasem Shihada
Associate Professor, Computer, Electrical and Mathematical Science and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal, Saudi Arabia
6:00 PM

Dinner

Sunset watch at King Abdullah’s monument followed by dinner at the Fish Restaurant in Thuwal. Bus will depart from KAUST Inn at 6:00 PM. By invitation.

Keynote Speakers

 1Erol Gelenbe

Professor, Institute of Theoretical and Applied Informatics (IITIS-PAN), Polish Academy of Sciences & Imperial College London; French National Academy of Technologies

 2Mary Ann Piette

Scientific Division Director, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA

 3Ali Shakouri

Professor, Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University

Speakers

 aAkmal Abdelfatah

Professor, Civil Engineering; American University of Sharjah, UAE

 bFumiyuki Adachi

Specially Appointed Professor for Research, Research Organization of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan

 cTareq Al-Naffouri

Associate Professor, Computer, Electrical and Mathematical Science and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal, Saudi Arabia

 caMohamed-Slim Alouini

Professor and Associate Dean, Computer, Electrical, and Mathematical Science and Engineering (CEMSE) Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal, Saudi Arabia

 cbThamir Al Shehri

Senior Research Associate, Energy Transitions & Electric Power, King Abdullah Petroleum Studies and Research Center (KAPSARC), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

 dMohamad Assaad

Professor, Telecommunications Department, CentraleSupélec, Paris, France

 eOmar Bahammam

Professor, Architecture and Planning, King Saud University, KSA

 fCarolyn Beck

Associate Professor , University of Illinois, Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

 gbKevin Cullen

Vice President of Innovation and Economic Development, KAUST

 hFadel Digham

Executive Director, National Telecom Regulator Authority of Egypt

 haMootaz Elnozahy

Dean of Computer, Electrical and Mathematical Science and Engineering, KAUST

 iAbdulmotaleb El Saddik

Distinguished Professor and University Research Chair, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Ottawa, Canada

 jSonja Glavaski

Executive Vice President of Innovation, The Faraday Grid, USA

 kEbru Aydin Gol

Assistant Professor, Computer Engineering, Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey

 lYaser Hawas

Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering at the UAE University, UAE

 mIbrahim Hoteit

Associate Professor, Earth Science and Engineering, Physical Science and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal, Saudi Arabia

 nRoger Howe

Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University

 oMuhammad Hussain

Professor, Computer, Electrical, and Mathematical Science and Engineering (CEMSE) Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal, Saudi Arabia

 pQing-Shan Jia

Associate Professor, Center for Intelligent and Networked Systems, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China

 qSamar Saber Khan

Assistant Professor and Dean of College of Business, Effat University, KSA

 sAnis Koubaa

Professor, Computer Science, Prince Sultan University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

 tSudip Misra

Professor, Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, India

 uChristopher Pain

Professor, Department of Earth Science & Engineering, Imperial College, London, UK

 ubTadeusz Patzek

Professor, Energy Resources and Petroleum Engineering and Director, Ali I. Al-Naimi Petroleum Engineering Research Center

 vBasem Shihada

Associate Professor, Computer, Electrical and Mathematical Science and Engineering Division, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal, Saudi Arabia

 wHaixia Zhang

Professor, School of Control Science and Engineering, Shandong University